Political Speeches (Oxford World's Classics)

BOOK: Political Speeches (Oxford World's Classics)
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© D. H. Berry 2006

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First published as an Oxford World’s Classics paperback 2006

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British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data
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Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data
Cicero, Marcus Tullius.
[Speeches. Selections. English]
Political speeches/Cicero; translated with introductions and notes by D. H. Berry.
p. cm.—(Oxford world’s classics)
Includes bibliographical references (p. ).
1. Cicero, Marcus Tullius—Translations into English. 2. Speeches,
addresses, etc., Latin—Translations into English. 3. Rome—Politics
and government—265–30 B.C.—Sources. I. Berry, D. H. II. Title.
III. Series: Oxford world’s classics (Oxford University Press)
PA6307.A4B474   2006   875′.01—dc22   2005020919

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by RefineCatch Limited, Bungay, Suffolk
Printed in Great Britain by
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ISBN 0–19–283266–2    978–0–19–283266–5
1

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OXFORD WORLD’S CLASSICS

CICERO

Political Speeches

Translated with Introductions and Notes by
D. H. BERRY

OXFORD WORLD’S CLASSICS

POLITICAL SPEECHES

M
ARCUS
T
ULLIUS
C
ICERO
(106–43
BC
) was the son of a Roman
eques
from Arpinum, some 70 miles south-east of Rome. He rose to prominence through his skill in speaking and his exceptional success in the criminal courts, where he usually spoke for the defence. Although from a family that had never produced a Roman senator, he secured election to all the major political offices at the earliest age permitted by law. His consulship fell in a year (63) in which a dangerous insurrection occurred, the Catilinarian conspiracy; by his persuasive oratory and his controversial execution of five confessed conspirators, he prevented the conspiracy from breaking out at Rome and was hailed as the father of his country. Exiled for the executions by his enemy Clodius in 58 but recalled the following year, he lost his political independence as a result of the domination of politics by the military dynasts Pompey and Caesar. His governorship of Cilicia (51–50) was exemplary in its honesty and fairness. Always a firm republican, he reluctantly supported Pompey in the Civil War, but was pardoned by Caesar. He was not let into the plot against Caesar, but was in a sense its inspiration, being seen by now as a symbol of the republic. After Caesar’s assassination (44), he supported the young Octavian (the future emperor Augustus) and led the senate in its operations against Mark Antony. When Octavian and Antony formed the ‘second triumvirate’ with Lepidus in 43, Cicero was their most prominent victim; he met his end with great courage.

Cicero’s speeches are models of eloquence and persuasion; and together with his letters they form the chief source for the history of the late republic. His philosophical treatises, written in periods when he was deprived of his political freedom, are the main vehicle by which Hellenistic philosophy was transmitted to the west. His prose style raised the Latin language to an elegance and beauty that was never surpassed.

D. H. B
ERRY
is Senior Lecturer in Classics at the University of Leeds. He has published an edition of and commentary on Cicero’s
Pro Sulla
(Cambridge Classical Texts and Commentaries, 1996) and a translation
Cicero: Defence Speeches
(Oxford World’s Classics, 2000), to which this book is a companion volume. He lives in Leeds and the Scottish Borders.

CONTENTS

Acknowledgements

Abbreviations

Introduction

Note on the Translation

Note on the Latin Text

Select Bibliography

Chronology

Maps

POLITICAL SPEECHES

In Verrem (‘Against Verres’) I

In Verrem (‘Against Verres’) II.5

De imperio Cn. Pompei (‘On the command of Gnaeus Pompeius’)

In Catilinam (‘Against Catiline’) I

In Catilinam (‘Against Catiline’) II

In Catilinam (‘Against Catiline’) III

In Catilinam (‘Against Catiline’) IV

Pro Marcello (‘For Marcellus’)

Philippic II

Explanatory Notes

Glossary

To my father

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

T
HIS
book has long been overdue to my patient publisher. That I have finally had time to write it, and with the care that it required, is due entirely to the generosity of two bodies: the University of Leeds, which granted me a University Study Leave Award in the Humanities from September 2003 to January 2004, and the Arts and Humanities Research Board, which granted me a Research Leave Award from February to May 2004. I am deeply grateful to both of them for effectively giving me the year I needed to bring this project to completion.

I am also grateful to Professor Andrew R. Dyck for letting me see his list of textual readings and his appendix on the date of
In Catilinam
I from his forthcoming Cambridge edition of the
Catilinarians
. It should perhaps be pointed out that I have not seen his edition and he has not seen this book; readers who use both works together will no doubt discover important differences of opinion between us. On the subject of editions, I should mention that I have profited enormously from those of W. K. Lacey, D. R. Shackleton Bailey, and, especially, J. T. Ramsey on the
Second Philippic
. If works of this quality were available for Cicero’s other speeches, my task would have been much easier—though also perhaps less necessary.

I have often thought while writing this book how lucky I am to be able to read Cicero in Latin, and to have studied Latin continuously since the age of 9. It was my father who paid for my education, and it is therefore fitting that I dedicate this book to him, with love.

ABBREVIATIONS
Asc.
Asconius
Cic.
Arch
.
Cicero,
Pro Archia
 
Att
.
Epistulae ad Atticum
 
Brut
.
Brutus
 
Cael
.
Pro Caelio
 
Cat
.
In Catilinam
 
Clu
.
Pro Cluentio
 
Div. Caec
.
Divinatio in Caecilium
 
Fam
.
Epistulae ad familiares
 
Flac
.
Pro Flacco
 
Imp
.
De imperio Cn. Pompei (Pro lege Manilia)
 
Marc
.
Pro Marcello
 
Mur
.
Pro Murena
 
Off
De officiis
 
Orat
.
Orator
 
Phil
.
Orationes Philippicae (Philippics)
 
Pis
.
In Pisonem
 
Scaur
.
Pro Scauro
 
S. Rosc
.
Pro Roscio Amerino
 
Sul
.
Pro Sulla
 
Ver
.
In Verrem
Plin.
Nat
.
Pliny the Elder,
Natural History
Plut.
Ant
.
Plutarch,
Life of Antony
 
Caes
.
Life of Caesar
 
Cat. Mi
.
Life of Cat? the Younger
 
Cic
.
Life of Cicero
 
Luc
.
Life of Lucullus
 
Pomp
.
Life of Pompey
Quint.
Inst
.
Quintilian,
Institutio oratoria
Sal.
Cat
.
Sallust,
Catilina
BOOK: Political Speeches (Oxford World's Classics)
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