Best European Fiction 2013

Advertising Download Read Online

BEST
EUROPEAN
FICTION
2013

EDITED AND
WITH AN
INTRODUCTION
BY
ALEKSANDAR
HEMON

PREFACE BY JOHN BANVILLE

Contents

Cover

Title Page

PRAISE FOR
Best European Fiction

PREFACE

INTRODUCTION

space

[SLOVAKIA]
BALLA
Before the Breakup

[MACEDONIA]
ŽARKO KUJUNDŽISKI
When the Glasses Are Lost

[MONTENEGRO]
DRAGAN RADULOVIĆ
The Face

reality

[GEORGIA]
LASHA BUGADZE
The Sins of the Wolf

[BELGIUM: FRENCH]
PAUL EMOND
Grand Froid

[ARMENIA]
KRIKOR BELEDIAN
The Name under My Tongue

[RUSSIA]
KIRILL KOBRIN
Last Summer in Marienbad

art

[MOLDOVA]
VITALIE CIOBANU
Orchestra Rehearsal

[IRELAND: IRISH]
TOMÁS MAC SÍOMÓIN
Music in the Bone

[FINLAND]
TIINA RAEVAARA
My Creator, My Creation

memory

[HUNGARY]
MIKLÓS VAJDA
Portrait of a Mother in an American Frame

[TURKEY: GERMAN]
ZEHRA ÇIRAK
Memory Cultivation Salon
157

[PORTUGAL]
DULCE MARIA CARDOSO
Angels on the Inside

[LATVIA]
GUNDEGA REPŠE
How Important Is It to Be Ernest?

death

[UKRAINE]
TANIA MALYARCHUK
Me and My Sacred Cow

[SPAIN: CASTILIAN]
ELOY TIZÓN
The Mercury in the Thermometers

[BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA]
SEMEZDIN MEHMEDINOVIĆ
My Heart

[AUSTRIA]
LYDIA MISCHKULNIG
A Protagonist’s Nemesis

body

[FRANCE]
MARIE REDONNET
Madame Zabée’s Guesthouse

[LITHUANIA]
IEVA TOLEIKYTĖ
The Eye of the Maples

[BULGARIA]
RUMEN BALABANOV
The Ragiad

women

[UNITED KINGDOM: ENGLAND]
A. S. BYATT
Dolls’ Eyes

[ESTONIA]
KRISTIINA EHIN
The Surrealist’s Daughter

[POLAND]
SYLWIA CHUTNIK
It’s All Up to You

men

[LIECHTENSTEIN]
DANIEL BATLINER
Malcontent’s Monologue

[SPAIN: BASQUE]
BERNARDO ATXAGA
Pirpo and Chanberlán, Murderers

[SERBIA]
BORIVOJE ADAŠEVIĆ
For a Foreign Master

marriage

[SLOVENIA]
MIRANA LIKAR BAJŽELJ
Nada’s Tablecloth

[DENMARK]
CHRISTINA HESSELHOLDT
Camilla and the Horse

[ROMANIA]
DAN LUNGU
7
P.M.
Wife

sons

[SWITZERLAND]
BERNARD COMMENT
A Son

[UNITED KINGDOM: WALES]
RAY FRENCH
Migration

[IRELAND: ENGLISH]
MIKE MCCORMACK
Of One Mind

Americans

[ICELAND]
GYRÐIR ELÍASSON
The Music Shop

[NORWAY]
ARI BEHN
Thunder Snow
and
When a Dollar Was a Big Deal

INDEX BY COUNTRY

INDEX BY AUTHOR

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHIES

TRANSLATOR BIOGRAPHIES

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

RIGHTS AND PERMISSIONS

Copyright

PRAISE FOR
Best European Fiction


Best European Fiction 2010
. . . offers an appealingly diverse look at the Continent’s fiction scene.”
THE NEW YORK TIMES

“The work is vibrant, varied, sometimes downright odd. As [Zadie] Smith says [in her preface]: ‘I was educated in a largely Anglo-American library, and it is sometimes dull to stare at the same four walls all day.’ Here’s the antidote.”
FINANCIAL TIMES

“With the new anthology
Best European Fiction
… our literary world just got wider.”
TIME MAGAZINE

“The collection’s diverse range of styles includes more experimental works than a typical American anthology might … [Mr. Hemon’s] only criteria were to include the best works from as many countries as possible.”
WALL STREET JOURNAL

“This is a precious opportunity to understand more deeply the obsessions, hopes and fears of each nation’s literary psyche—a sort of international show-and-tell of the soul.”
THE GUARDIAN

“Readers for whom the expression ‘foreign literature’ means the work of Canada’s Alice Munro stand to have their eyes opened wide and their reading exposure exploded as they encounter works from places such as Croatia, Bulgaria, and Macedonia (and, yes, from more familiar terrain, such as Spain, the UK, and Russia).”
BOOKLIST STARRED REVIEW

“[W]e can be thankful to have so many talented new voices to discover.”
LIBRARY JOURNAL

“[W]hat the reader takes from them are not only the usual pleasures of fiction—the twists and turns of plot, chance to inhabit other lives, other ways of being—but new ways of thinking about how to tell a story.”
CHRISTOPHER MERRILL, PRI’S “THE WORLD” HOLIDAY PICK

“The book tilts toward unconventional storytelling techniques. And while we’ve heard complaints about this before—why only translate the most difficult work coming out of Europe?—it makes sense here. The book isn’t testing the boundaries, it’s opening them up.”
TIME OUT CHICAGO

“Editor Aleksandar Hemon declares in his preface that at the heart of this compilation is the ‘nonnegotiable need for communication with the world, wherever it may be,’ and asserts that ongoing translation is crucial to this process. The English-language reading world, ‘wherever it may be,’ is grateful.”
THE BELIEVER

“Does European literature exist? Of course it does, and this collection of forty-one stories proves it.”
THE INDEPENDENT

Preface

It is not only in French that the words
translate
and
traduce
bear a close affinity. Legend has it that John Braine’s novel of ambition and opportunism in 1950s Britain,
Room at the Top
, in its Swedish version was very nearly entitled
Vinden
—‘The Attic’—until a vigilant editor thought to double-check. It is also said that in a passage in one of Sean O’Casey’s plays of Dublin working-class life where a character speaks of the ‘little chislers’, that is, children, an earnest Japanese translator rendered the colloquialism as ‘small stone-masons’. One laughs, of course, but at the same time one does sympathise with the hapless traducer. Language is a sly and treacherous medium.

We are all familiar with Robert Frost’s mournful contention that poetry is what gets lost in translation, but meaning itself can go subtly or grossly astray in the crossing from one tongue to another—not so much tripping lightly, one might say, as merely tripping. The problem, as any translator will ruefully remind us, is that in the original text meaning is not fixed, but is always more or less ambiguous. This is so not only in verse, but can be true of the most seemingly limpid passages of prose. You sit down to write a letter to your lover, or your bank manager, thinking you know exactly what you have to say, yet when you finish and read over what you have written you notice that the sense is not quite as you intended. Who speaks here, you wonder? The answer is, language itself, wilful, subtle, coercive. We think we speak, but really it is we who are spoken.

Even when language seems at its most docile, the sense, or non-sense, of a phrase can turn on the most innocent-seeming effect. Take that comma in the opening sentence of Wittgenstein’s
Tractatus LogicoPhilosophicus
. In the original the first proposition is written thus: ‘
Die Welt ist alles, was der Fall ist
.’ Wittgenstein in his early work was fond of symmetry, and certainly this is a handsomely symmetrical sentence. However, the rules of punctuation in German are strict, and by those rules a comma is called for here, at the halfway point in the sentence, making for a nice caesura.

Other books

Rumple What? by Nancy Springer
Razzmatazz-DDL by Patricia Burroughs
Target in the Night by Ricardo Piglia
By Familiar Means by Delia James
Stringer by Anjan Sundaram
Moon Over Soho by Ben Aaronovitch