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Authors: Lissa Evans

Big Change for Stuart

BOOK: Big Change for Stuart
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Contents

Cover

About the Book

Title Page

Dedication

Chapter 1

Chapter 2

Chapter 3

Chapter 4

Chapter 5

Chapter 6

Chapter 7

Chapter 8

Chapter 9

Chapter 10

Chapter 11

Chapter 12

Chapter 13

Chapter 14

Chapter 15

Chapter 16

Chapter 17

Chapter 18

Chapter 19

Chapter 20

Chapter 21

Chapter 22

Chapter 23

Chapter 24

Chapter 25

Chapter 26

Chapter 27

Chapter 28

Chapter 29

Chapter 30

Chapter 31

Chapter 32

Chapter 33

Chapter 34

Chapter 35

Chapter 36

Chapter 37

Chapter 38

Chapter 39

Chapter 40

Chapter 41

Epilogue

Extract from ‘Small Change for Stuart'

About the Author

Also by Lissa Evans

Copyright

About the Book

Stuart Horten (ten, but looks younger) is now the owner of a magician's workshop – except that without his Great-Uncle's Last Will and Testament, he can't actually prove it. Which is a problem, since someone else wants it as well; someone who has a lot of money.

The workshop contains seven magnificent stage illusions, but when Stuart starts to investigate them, he discovers that each is the gateway to a magical adventure, with a puzzle to solve, and a clue to extract.

As the clues mount up, the adventures become riskier. Friendship is strained, and danger looms and Stuart has to decide what sort of prize he really, truly wants.

For my mum
Who read like the wind and loved books
And who was always the first to read mine.

STUART HORTEN SAT
at the kitchen table and looked at the front page of the crummy little newspaper he'd just been given. Then, with a feeling of foreboding, he began to read.

‘Why do your sisters keep writing that?' asked Stuart indignantly.

‘Keep writing what?' asked his friend and next-door neighbour, April Kingley, who'd brought him the paper. ‘You mean
ten, but looks younger
?'

‘No. The word
claims
.
Stuart claims this, Stuart claims that
. As if I was making it all up.'

April shrugged. ‘Reporters have to have proof.'

Stuart rolled his eyes. The Kingley triplets were always referring to themselves as ‘reporters', as if
they
were writing for some important national newspaper, instead of a flimsy four-page hand-out, invented as a holiday project, printed out in their bedroom and forced on the neighbours.

‘I couldn't exactly tell them the truth, could I?' he asked. ‘I couldn't tell them that I found a stash of magic threepences, hidden by my great-uncle, together with a note telling me to try and find his lost workshop. I couldn't tell them that I put coins in old slot machines all over Beeton, which ended up leading me to the room under the bandstand. I couldn't tell them that one of the stage illusions I found there was called the Well of Wishes, and it actually
did
grant wishes when you chucked in a coin. They'd think I was mad.'

He couldn't face reading the rest of the article, and instead turned the paper over and looked at the back page.

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