Read Japanese Fairy Tales Online

Authors: Yei Theodora Ozaki

Japanese Fairy Tales

BOOK: Japanese Fairy Tales
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Prince Yamato Take bade his wife help him to attire himself like a woman.

 

 

Published by Tuttle Publishing, an imprint of Periplus Editions (HK) Ltd.

 

www.tuttlepublishing.com

 

© 1970 by Charles E. Tuttle Publishing Co., Inc.

All rights reserved

 

LCC Card No. 70-109415

ISBN 978-1-4629-0352-8 (ebook)

 

First edition, 1970

Printed in Singapore

Distributed by:

 

Japan

Tuttle Publishing

Yaekari Building, 3rd Floor

5-4-12 Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-0032

Tel: (81) 3 5437-0171; Fax: (81) 3 5437-0755

Email: [email protected]

 

North America, Latin America & Europe

Tuttle Publishing

364 Innovation Drive

North Clarendon, VT 05759-9436, U.S.A.

Tel: 1 (802) 773-8930; Fax: 1 (802) 773-6993

Email: [email protected]

www.tuttlepublishing.com

 

Asia Pacific

Berkeley Books Pte. Ltd.

61 Tai Seng Avenue, #02-12 Singapore 534167

Tel: (65) 6280-1330; Fax: (65) 6280-6290

Email: [email protected]

www.periplus.com

14 13 12 11      9 8 7 6 5

 

TUT TLE PUBLISHING® is a registered trademark of Tuttle Publishing, a division of Periplus Editions (HK) Ltd.

 

 

To

Eleanor Marion-Crawford.

 

Dedicate this Book

To you and to the sweet child-friendship that you gave me in the days spent with you by the southern sea, when you used to listen with unfeigned pleasure to these fairy stories from far Japan. May they now remind you of my changeless love and remembrance.

 

Y.T.O.

 

Tokyo, 1903.

 

Table of Contents

 

 

 

PUBLISHER’S FOREWORD

9

PREFACE

11

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

13

MY LORD BAG OF RICE

17

THE TONGUE-CUT SPARROW

25

THE STORY OF URASHIMA TARO, THE FISHER LAD

37

THE FARMER AND THE BADGER

51

THE
SHINANSHA
, OR THE SOUTH POINTING CARRIAGE

60

THE ADVENTURES OF KINTARO, THE GOLDEN BOY

65

THE STORY OF PRINCESS HASE

76

THE STORY OF THE MAN WHO DID NOT WISH TO DIE

87

THE BAMBOO-CUTTER AND THE MOON-CHILD

96

THE MIRROR OF MATSUYAMA

114

THE GOBLIN OF ADACHIGAHARA

131

THE SAGACIOUS MONKEY AND THE BOAR

138

THE HAPPY HUNTER AND THE SKILFUL FISHER

142

THE STORY OF THE OLD MAN WHO MADE WITHERED TREES TO FLOWER

161

THE JELLY FISH AND THE MONKEY

171

THE QUARREL OF THE MONKEY AND THE CRAB

182

THE WHITE HARE AND THE CROCODILES

192

THE STORY OF PRINCE YAMATO TAKE

200

MOMOTARO, OR THE STORY OF THE SON OF A PEACH

216

THE OGRE OF RASHOMON

230

HOW AN OLD MAN LOST HIS WEN

238

THE STONES OF FIVE COLOURS AND THE EMPRESS JOKWA .

246

 

 
Publisher’s Foreword

 

 

 

FAIRY tales never go out of style; they are the stuff of dreams and life and imagination, immortalized in the human spirit.

These beautiful legends and tales of old Japan were written for the children of the West, and have been translated from the modern version by Sadanami Sanjin. They are not literal translations, although the Japanese story and all quaint Japanese expressions have been faithfully preserved. In a few instances, to enhance interest and enjoyment, the compiler has used incidents from other versions.

The quaint Japanese expressions have been superbly matched by the quaint but evocative and humanly stirring illustrations by Kakuzo Fujiyama, an artist who lived in Tokyo. There are 66 pictures for the 22 tales, an average of three for each tale.

The tales are about commoners and kings; castles and fairy-lands; good old folks and bad old folks; princesses and warriors; animals, birds, the sky and sea, and the illimitable realms of the imagination.

The stories are the old favorites, such as “Momotaro, or the Story of the Son of a Peach,” and “The Story of Urashima Taro, the Fisher Lad”—and many of the lesser known ones such as “The Stones of Five Colours and the Empress Jokwa.”

All will have wide appeal to children whose minds and imaginations transcend racial barriers. The “twain shall meet” through the medium of these delightful magic carpets. This book was originally published by Archibold Constable & Co., Ltd., Westminster.

 

 
Preface

 

 

 

THIS collection of Japanese fairy tales is the outcome of a sugges-tion made to me indirectly through a friend by Mr. Andrew Lang.

They have been translated from the modern version written by Sadanami Sanjin. These stories are not literal translations, and though the Japanese story and all quaint Japanese expressions have been faithfully preserved, they have been told more with the view to interest young readers of the West than the technical student of folk-lore.

Grateful acknowledgment is due to Mr. Y. Yasuoka, Miss Fusa Okamoto, my brother Nobumori Ozaki, Dr. Yoshihiro Takaki, and Miss Kameko Yamao, who have helped me with translations.

The story which I have named “The Story of the Man who did not Wish to Die” is taken from a little book written a hundred years ago by one Shinsui Tamenaga. It is named Chosei Furo, or “Longevity.” “The Bamboo-cutter and the Moon-child” is taken from the classic “Taketari Monogatari,” and is not classed by the Japanese among their fairy tales, though it really belongs to this class of literature.

The pictures were drawn by Mr. Kakuzo Fujiyama, a Tokyo artist.

In telling these stories in English I have followed my fancy in adding such touches of local colour or description as they seemed to need or as pleased me, and in one or two instances I have gathered in an incident from another version. At all times, among my friends, both young and old, English or American, I have always found eager listeners to the beautiful legends and fairy tales of Japan, and in telling them I have also found that they were still unknown to the vast majority, and this has encouraged me to write them for the children of the West.

 

Y. T. O.

 

TOKYO, 1903.

 

 
List of Illustrations

 

 

 

Page

PRINCE YAMATO TAKE BADE HIS WIFE HELP HIM ATTIRE HIMSELF LIKE A WOMAN

Frontispiece

PUTTING ASIDE ALL FEAR, HE WENT FORWARD DAUNTLESSLY

18

HIDESATO TOOK ANOTHER ARROW

21

THE PROCESSION

24

AND WITH THESE DREADFUL WORDS SHE DROVE THE BIRD AWAY

27

THE LADY SPARROW INTRODUCED ALL HER FAMILY

30

THE OLD WOMAN HAD NEVER BEEN SO FRIGHTENED IN HER LIFE

35

THE GATE OF SOME LARGE PALACE

42

URASHIMA TARO AND THE SEA KING’S DAUGHTER

45

A BEAUTIFUL LITTLE PURPLE CLOUD ROSE OUT OF THE BOX

49

THE FARMER’S WIFE POUNDING BARLEY

52

HE SET THE BUNDLE OF GRASS ON FIRE

56

HE RAISED HIS OAR AND STRUCK AT THE BADGER WITH ALL

HIS STRENGTH

58

HE THOUGHT AND PONDERED DEEPLY

61

HE MOUNTED THE DRAGON

63

THEN THE MONKEY AND THE HARE HOPPED OUT

67

THE KIND GENERAL GRADUALLY UNFOLDED HIS PLAN

72

LORD RAIKO ORDERED KINTARO TO THE RESCUE

74

HASE-HIME LISTENED IN AN ATTITUDE OF RESPECT

78

HER FATHER SENT FOR HER AND TOLD HER WHAT WAS REQUIRED OF HER

81

TAKEN BY SURPRISE, SHE COULD HARDLY REALISE THAT IT

WAS HER FATHER

84

THE CRANE FLEW AWAY, RIGHT OUT TO SEA

90

HE SCREAMED OUT TO JOFUKU TO COME AND RESCUE HIM

93

HE TOOK THE LITTLE CREATURE IN HIS HAND

97

THE SCREENS SLID OPEN, REVEALING THE PRINCESS

110

THEY ALL GAZED WITH TEARFUL EYES AT THE RECEDING PRINCESS.

112

THE WIFE GAZED INTO THE SHINING DISC

115

THEY WATCHED HIM AS HE WENT DOWN THE ROAD

116

“WHAT I HAVE BROUGHT YOU IS CALLED A MIRROR”

118

THE MOTHER ROUSED HERSELF, AND TOOK HER DAUGHTER’S HAND

121

IN THE ROUND MIRROR BEFORE HER SHE SAW HER MOTHER’S FACE

123

HE PRESSED THE OLD WOMAN TO LET HIM STAY, BUT SHE SEEMED VERY RELUCTANT

132

WHAT HE SAW FROZE THE BLOOD IN HIS VEINS

135

AFTER HIM RUSHED THE DREADFUL OLD HAG

136

THE MONKEY BEGAN HIS TALE OF WOE

139

THE MONKEY WAS RUNNING AFTER THE THIEF AS FAST AS HIS LEGS

WOULD CARRY HIM

140

THE HAPPY HUNTER IN VAIN BESOUGHT HIS BROTHER TO PARDON HIM

143

THE CUTTLEFISH OPENED THE TAI’S MOUTH

154

HE TOOK OUT THE JEWEL OF THE FLOOD TIDE

158

THE DEEPER HE DUG, THE MORE GOLD COINS DID THE OLD MAN FIND

162

THE WITHERED TREE AT ONCE BURST INTO FULL BLOOM

166

THE DAIMIO ORDERED HIS RETAINERS TO PUT THE IMPOSTOR IN PRISON

168

THE DRAGON KING BLAMED THE DOCTOR FOR NOT CURING THE QUEEN

173

“PLEASE DON’T GO SO FAST, OR I AM SURE I SHALL FALL OFF,” SAID THE MONKEY

177

THEY BEAT THE JELLY FISH TO A FLAT PULP

180

THE MONKEY PROPOSED THE EXCHANGE OF THE HARD PERSIMMON-SEED FOR THE CRAB’S NICE DUMPLING

183

THE MONKEY BEGAN TO PLUCK AND EAT AS FAST AS HE COULD

185

“IT WAS YOUR FATHER’S FAULT, NOT MINE,” GASPED THE UNREPENTANT MONKEY

190

SOME OF THE CROCODILES RAN AFTER THE HARE AND CAUGHT HIM

194

THIS MAN HAD A KIND HEART, AND LOOKED AT THE HARE VERY

PITYINGLY

196

WHEN THE PRINCESS HAD LOOKED AT THE KIND BORTHER’S FACE, SHE WENT STRAIGHT UP TO HIM

199

A DAGGER FLASHED BEFORE HIS EYES

205

A MONSTER SERPENT APPEARED

213

SHE SET TO WORK TO WASH THE CLOTHES

217

THE PEACH SPLIT IN TWO OF ITSELF

218

MOMOTARO RETURNED TRIUMPHANTLY HOME, TAKING WITH HIM THE DEVIL CHIEF AS HIS CAPTIVE

228

WATANABE FINDS THE ARM OF THE OGRE

232

SOMEONE WAS KNOCKING AT THE PORCH, ASKING FOR ADMITTANCE

235

IN THIS WAY THE OGRE ESCAPED WITH HIS ARM

237

THE DEMON TOOK THE GREAT LUMP FROM THE OLD MAN’S CHEEK

241

THE OLD MAN TOLD HIS NEIGHBOUR ALL THAT HAD HAPPENED

243

THERE WAS NOW A GREAT WEN ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF HIS FACE AS ON THE LEFT

244

THE EMPRESS JOKWA

247

HAKO LOOKED BACK, AND SAW EIKO UNSHEATHING A LARGE SWORD

248

EIKO VISITS THE FIRE KING

252

THE AMBASSADORS SET OUT IN THE MAGIC CHARIOTS

255

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