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Authors: Annabella Bloom

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Pride and Prejudice (The Wild and Wanton Edition)

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Pride and Prejudice

The WILD and WANTON Edition

Annabella Bloom and Jane Austen

Introduction

Dear Reader,

Welcome to Crimson Romance’s Wild and Wanton line!

At Crimson Romance, we publish romance in every genre — including contemporary, historical, paranormal, suspense, and spicy — and with five new e-books released every week, our readers have all the heart-grabbing plots, mouthwatering heroes, and super steamy love scenes they could want!

We’re always trying to find new ways to appeal to our readers, so we looked around and saw that our parent company, Adams Media, had released two print books that sexed up favorite classics. These are
Wuthering Heights: The Wild and Wanton Edition
and
Pride and Prejudice: The Wild and Wanton Edition
and they are hot hot hot!

We love the classics, and we also love sexy reads, so we said, “Let’s make these Crimson books!” So that’s what we did — we gave them new covers and put them into our lineup. And then we said, “Let’s make a whole line of Wild and Wanton books!” So that’s what we’re doing.

With the growing trend of “mashing up” genres in romance (for example, suspense novels with strong paranormal elements or historical novels featuring a time-traveling contemporary heroine), we thought readers would enjoy reading the classics with the sexy parts put in.

Beginning with
Pride and Prejudice
and
Wuthering Heights
, our new Wild and Wanton books answer the questions that most romance buffs have probably thought but never asked: What would it be like to see Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy throw propriety to the wind and act on their intense physical attraction toward each other? What are Catherine and Heathcliff
really
doing behind closed doors? And how do the Dashwood sisters use their sense and sensibility when it comes to the bedroom?

We hope you enjoy discovering the answers to these questions as much as we have! Happy reading!

— The Editors of Crimson Romance

PRAISE FOR
PRIDE AND PREJUDICE: THE WILD AND WANTON EDITION

“It is a truth universally acknowledged that the romance of Eliza Bennet and Mr. Darcy is told with a clever intelligence and great wit. Now it is also a work of captivating passion. Michelle Pillow [writing as Annabella Bloom] has honored Austen’s original novel while giving readers an intimate view of this classic love story, taking the romance from the parlor into the bedroom. Do not miss this book.”

— A
LISON
K
ENT
, bestselling, award-winning author of over thirty works,
www.alisonkent.com

“Fans of Austen’s classic will find the same great story, expertly embellished into this ‘Wild and Wanton’ edition that’s sure to please readers who enjoy a spicier tale. If you ever wanted to know what Mr. Darcy was really thinking, check out this book!”

— M
EGAN
H
ART
, award-winning author of
Pleasure and Purpose,
www.meganhart.com

“A sensual take on a favorite classic. You’ll never look at Mr. Darcy the same way! Michelle Pillow [writing as Annabella Bloom] heats up the pages and makes the romance burn with passion. Unforgettable!”

— C
YNTHIA
E
DEN
, award-winning author of
Deadly Fear,
www.cynthiaeden.com

“We’ve never seen a hotter Mr. Darcy. I couldn’t tell where Austen ended and Pillow [as Bloom] began … or put it down.”

— C
ANDACE
H
AVENS
, bestselling and award-winning author of
Dragons Prefer Blondes,
www.candacehavens.com

“Michelle Pillow [writing as Annabella Bloom] has ushered the Austen we know and love into the new millennium. Wonderful!”

— M
ANDY
M. R
OTH
, award-winning paranormal author,
www.mandyroth.com

“Michelle Pillow [writing as Annabella Bloom] blends delicious sensuality and heat seamlessly into a classic beloved novel. A wonderful, romantic ride. Bravo, Michelle!”

— D
ENISE
A. A
GNEW
, award-winning author of
Dangerous Intentions,
www.deniseagnew.com

“This spicy take on
Pride and Prejudice
leaves readers’ hearts racing and fingers turning to get to the next page, to know about Elizabeth and Darcy — will they or won’t they? I couldn’t put it down; I had to know if their wild and wanton attraction would win in the end.”

— C
ANDICE
G
ILMER
,
www.Candicegilmer.com

CONTENTS

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

NOTE FROM ONE OF THE AUTHORS

CHAPTER ONE

CHAPTER TWO

CHAPTER THREE

CHAPTER FOUR

CHAPTER FIVE

CHAPTER SIX

CHAPTER SEVEN

CHAPTER EIGHT

CHAPTER NINE

CHAPTER TEN

CHAPTER ELEVEN

CHAPTER TWELVE

CHAPTER THIRTEEN

CHAPTER FOURTEEN

CHAPTER FIFTEEN

CHAPTER SIXTEEN

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN

CHAPTER NINETEEN

CHAPTER TWENTY

CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE

CHAPTER TWENTY-TWO

CHAPTER TWENTY-THREE

CHAPTER TWENTY-FOUR

CHAPTER TWENTY-FIVE

CHAPTER TWENTY-SIX

CHAPTER TWENTY-SEVEN

CHAPTER TWENTY-EIGHT

CHAPTER TWENTY-NINE

CHAPTER THIRTY

CHAPTER THIRTY-ONE

CHAPTER THIRTY-TWO

CHAPTER THIRTY-THREE

CHAPTER THIRTY-FOUR

CHAPTER THIRTY-FIVE

CHAPTER THIRTY-SIX

CHAPTER THIRTY-SEVEN

CHAPTER THIRTY-EIGHT

CHAPTER THIRTY-NINE

CHAPTER FORTY

CHAPTER FORTY-ONE

CHAPTER FORTY-TWO

CHAPTER FORTY-THREE

CHAPTER FORTY-FOUR

CHAPTER FORTY-FIVE

CHAPTER FORTY-SIX

CHAPTER FORTY-SEVEN

CHAPTER FORTY-EIGHT

CHAPTER FORTY-NINE

CHAPTER FIFTY

CHAPTER FIFTY-ONE

CHAPTER FIFTY-TWO

CHAPTER FIFTY-THREE

EPILOGUE

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

ALSO AVAILABLE

COPYRIGHT PAGE

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

H
OW CAN I POSSIBLY SAY a big enough thank you to the wonderful people in my life? Your love and support have been a true source of inspiration. To my mother, who nurtured my creativity, stood up to teachers who tried to doubt it, and let me raid her library. To my father, who instilled in me a great sense of honor and a love for learning, who also encouraged my artistic side when he gave me my first camera. To my husband, you are my knight in colorful armor. To my beautiful, talented, wonderful B, I know you will conquer the world. To my many sisters and the poor brother who had to live with us. To Carol, who has a generous spirit and an open kitchen filled with goodness. To Jean and Dave, who inherited me and did not throw me back. To Mandy M. Roth, a very talented writer and artist. I couldn’t ask for a better friend, writing buddy, or sister. Thank you for being there for me. I love you all.

To my agent, Laura Bradford of the Bradford Literary Agency, thank you for believing in me. You are a pleasure to work with. Also, to those who helped make this book possible: AE Rought, Gina Panettieri from Talcott Notch Literary, my editor Paula Munier, Meredith O’Hayre, and the people at Adams Media for giving me the chance to play in Jane Austen’s world. And, of course, the talented Jane Austen, the grandmother of all us modern day romance authors.

NOTE FROM ONE OF THE AUTHORS

W
HEN I WAS FIRST APPROACHED to work on this project, I was thrilled at the prospect of being allowed to play in Jane Austen’s world. I’ve been a fan of Austen’s since I discovered her books hidden on the shelves of the high school library, and have the greatest respect for her talent and imagination. The love story of Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy is easily one of the greatest romances ever written and I, like many
Pride and Prejudice
fans, long to know more, to peek behind the veil of this complicated relationship into the lives and private thoughts of these beloved characters — especially the enigmatic and often misunderstood Fitzwilliam Darcy.

Though nothing can compare to the true originality of Jane Austen’s work, it has been an honor working on this project. I hope you enjoy my peek into this world as much as I enjoyed writing it. Visit
www.MichellePillow.com
, where you can find deleted and expanded scenes and download free
Pride and Prejudice: The Wild and Wanton Edition
wallpaper and banners.

Happy Reading!

Michelle Pillow

CHAPTER ONE

I
T IS A TRUTH UNIVERSALLY ACKNOWLEDGED that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife. However little is known of the feelings or views of such a man upon his first entering a neighborhood, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of the surrounding families, that he is considered the rightful property of one or another of their daughters.

It is a truth
not
so universally acknowledged, that a young woman understands more about the ways of the world than she ought to know. In those unintentional lessons, rarely articulated but often learned, a woman understands she must be clever if she is in want of a desirable husband. Society expects this woman to be the picture of virtue and perfection, but men rarely fall in love with statues, which is why there is a vastly unspoken difference between the public and private thoughts of young ladies. Whereas public opinion makes ladies untouched by anything resembling the erotic, it was not unheard of to discover in the private diaries of these ladies that secrets of intimacy had passed between them and a fiancé. For a fiancé was as good as a husband and few saw reason to wait beyond such a happy occasion as a proper engagement, and these ladies only felt truly condemned if the act was not with a man of such position. In fact, it had been hinted nearly one out of every three brides gave birth to their first child a few months early.

When it came to the business of marriage, Mrs. Bennet often said to her daughters, “When you are married, you will see the way things are. That is why you must trust your parents to such a serious affair. We have the foresight to make a decision of such importance — and though I myself have had my share of flirtations, I pride myself on my wisdom of such things.” Despite this comment, it was not a statement Mrs. Bennet had enforced upon herself in girlhood concerning her own marriage. Mr. Bennet, having been captivated by youth and beauty, and that appearance of good humor which youth and beauty generally give, had married a woman whose weak understanding and illiberal mind had very early in their marriage put an end to all real affection for her. Respect, esteem, and confidence had vanished forever; and all his views of domestic happiness were overthrown. But Mr. Bennet was not of a disposition to seek comfort for the disappointment which his own imprudence had brought on, and did not partake of any of those unseemly pleasures which too often comfort the ill-fated.

Luckily for their second eldest daughter, Elizabeth, the education into the female arts did not rest solely upon the dear Mrs. Bennet’s shoulders, but rather on the secret books circulated among their peers and the gossip of the maids. In improving her mind, she had come to expect much more in a man than simple fortune and social standing could give. Elizabeth put importance on love, happiness, laughter, and companionship; in finding a true match to her playful heart and generous spirit. In this she was irrevocably encouraged by her father who believed no man would ever be good enough for his Lizzy. So thus educated in the ways of catching a husband, she did not intend to use her education. To her thinking, such marital scheming was best left to her mother who, though loved by her five daughters, was silly enough to be ignored by them.

“My dear Mr. Bennet,” his excited lady said to him one day when she believed them to be alone, “have you heard that Netherfield Park is let at last?”

Mr. Bennet replied he had not.

“But it is,” she insisted, “for Mrs. Long has just been here, and she told me all about it.”

Mr. Bennet made no answer.

“Do you not want to know who has taken it?” his wife demanded impatiently.

“You want to tell me, and I have no objection to hearing it.”

This was invitation enough.

“Why, my dear, you must know, Mrs. Long says that Netherfield is taken by a young man of large fortune from the north of England. He came down on Monday in a chaise and four to see the place, and was so delighted with it that he agreed with Mr. Morris immediately. He is to take possession before Michaelmas, and some of his servants are to be in the house by the end of next week.”

“What is his name.”

“Bingley.”

“Is he married or single.”

“Oh, single, my dear, to be sure! A single man of large fortune — four or five thousand a year. What a fine thing for our girls.”

Mr. Bennet pretended not to hear the giggling of eaves-droppers outside his window. “How so? How can it affect them?”

“My dear Mr. Bennet, how can you be so tiresome?” His wife moved about the room in a well practiced show of exasperation. “You must know that I am thinking of his marrying one of them.”

“Is that his design in settling here.”

“Design! Nonsense, how can you talk so? But it is very likely that he
may
fall in love with one of them, and therefore you must visit him as soon as he comes.”

“I see no occasion for that. You and the girls may go, or you may send them by themselves, which perhaps will be still better for as you are as handsome as any of them, Mr. Bingley may like you the best of the party.”

“My dear, you flatter me. I certainly have had my share of beauty, but I do not pretend to be anything extraordinary now. When a woman has five grown-up daughters, she ought to give over thinking of her own beauty.” Mrs. Bennet caught her wavy reflection in a windowpane and smiled briefly at herself.

“In such cases, a woman has not often much beauty to think of.”

Mrs. Bennet’s attempt to hide her pleasure at his compliment failed. “But, my dear, you must indeed go and see Mr. Bingley when he comes into the neighborhood.”

“It is more than I engage for, I assure you.”

“But consider your daughters. Only think what an establishment it would be for one of them. Sir William and Lady Lucas are determined to go, merely on that account, for in general, you know, they visit no newcomers. Indeed you must go, for it will be impossible for us to visit him if you do not.”

“You are over-scrupulous, surely. I daresay Mr. Bingley will be very glad to see you. I will send a few lines by you to assure him of my hearty consent to his marrying whichever he chooses of the girls. Though, I must throw in a good word for my little Lizzy.”

“I desire you will do no such thing. Lizzy is not a bit better than the others, and I am sure she is not half so handsome as Jane, nor half so good-humored as Lydia. But you are always giving her the preference.”

“None of them have much to recommend them,” he replied. “They are all silly and ignorant like other girls, but Lizzy has something more of quickness than her sisters.”

“Mr. Bennet, how can you abuse your own children in such a way? You take delight in vexing me. You have no compassion for my poor nerves.”

“You mistake me, my dear. I have a high respect for your nerves. They are my old friends. I have heard you mention them with consideration these last twenty years at least.”

Mr. Bennet was so odd a mixture of a fast mind, sarcastic humor, reserve, and caprice, that the experience of three-and-twenty years had been insufficient to make his wife understand his character. Her mind was less difficult to develop. She was a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper. When she was discontented, she fancied herself nervous. The business of her life was to get her daughters married, its solace was visiting and news.

Mr. Bennet was among the earliest of those who waited on Mr. Bingley. He had always intended to visit him, though to the last assuring his wife he should not go, and till the evening after the visit was paid she had no knowledge of it. It was then disclosed in the following manner. Observing his second daughter employed in trimming a hat, he suddenly addressed her with, “I hope Mr. Bingley will like it, Lizzy.”

“We are not in a way to know
what
Mr. Bingley likes,” her mother said resentfully, “since we are not to visit.”

“But you forget, mamma,” Elizabeth said. “Mrs. Long promised to introduce him at the assemblies.”

“I do not believe Mrs. Long will do any such thing. She has two nieces of her own. She is a selfish, hypocritical woman, and I have no opinion of her.”

“No more than I,” said Mr. Bennet, “and I am glad to find that you do not depend on her serving you.”

Mrs. Bennet deigned not to make any reply, but, unable to contain herself, began scolding one of her daughters. “Do not keep coughing so, Kitty, for Heaven’s sake! Have a little compassion on my nerves. You tear them to pieces.”

“I do not cough for my own amusement,” Kitty replied fretfully, before making an effort to turn the attention away from herself. “When is your next ball to be, Lizzy.”

“Tomorrow fortnight.”

“Aye, so it is,” cried her mother, “and Mrs. Long does not come back till the day before. It will be impossible for her to introduce him, for she will not know him herself.”

“Then, my dear, you may have the advantage of your friend, and introduce Mr. Bingley to
her
.”

“Impossible, Mr. Bennet, when I am not acquainted with him myself. How can you be so teasing.”

“I honor your circumspection. One cannot know what a man really is by the end of a fortnight. But if we do not venture somebody else will. After all, Mrs. Long and her daughters must stand their chance. Therefore, as she will think it an act of kindness, if you decline to take the responsibility, I will take it on myself.”

The girls stared at their father. Mrs. Bennet said only, “Nonsense, nonsense.”

“What can be the meaning of that emphatic exclamation?” he asked. “Do you consider the forms of introduction, and the stress that is laid on them, as nonsense? I cannot quite agree with you there. What say you, Mary? For you are a young lady of deep reflection, I know, and read great books.”

Mary wished to say something sensible, but knew not how.

“While Mary is adjusting her ideas,” he continued, “let us return to Mr. Bingley.”

“I am sick of Mr. Bingley.” His wife shook her head in dismay, growing more flustered with each passing second.

“I am sorry to hear that, but why did you not tell me that before? If I had known as much this morning I certainly would not have called on him. It is very unlucky but, as I have actually paid the visit, we cannot escape the acquaintance now.”

The astonishment of the ladies was just what he wished, with that of Mrs. Bennet surpassing the rest. Though, when the first tumult of joy was over, she began to declare that it was what she had expected all the while.

“How good it was of you, my dear Mr. Bennet, but I knew I should persuade you at last. I was sure you loved your girls too well to neglect such an acquaintance. It is such a good joke, too, that you should have gone this morning and never said a word about it till now.”

“Now, Kitty, you may cough as much as you choose.” Mr.

Bennet left the room, fatigued with the raptures of his wife.

“What an excellent father you have, girls,” their mother said, when the door was shut. “I do not know how you will ever make amends to him for his kindness; or me, either, for that matter. At our time of life it is not so pleasant, I can tell you, to be making new acquaintances every day, but for your sakes we would do anything.”

The rest of the evening was spent in speculating how soon Mr. Bingley would return Mr. Bennet’s visit, and determining when they should ask him to dinner.

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