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Authors: Philippa Gregory

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The Kingmaker's Daughter

BOOK: The Kingmaker's Daughter
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THE
KINGMAKER’S
DAUGHTER

By the same author

The Cousins’ War

The Lady of the Rivers

The White Queen

The Red Queen

History

The Women of the Cousins’ War:

The Duchess, the Queen and the King’s Mother

The Tudor Court Novels

The Constant Princess

The Other Boleyn Girl

The Boleyn Inheritance

The Queen’s Fool

The Virgin’s Lover

The Other Queen

Historical Novels

The Wise Woman

Fallen Skies

A Respectable Trade

The Wideacre Trilogy

Wideacre

The Favoured Child

Meridon

Civil War Novels

Earthly Joys

Virgin Earth

Modern Novels

Mrs Hartley and the Growth Centre

Perfectly Correct

The Little House

Zelda’s Cut

Short Stories

Bread and Chocolate

First published in Great Britain by Simon & Schuster UK Ltd, 2012
A CBS COMPANY

Copyright © Philippa Gregory, 2012

This book is copyright under the Berne Convention.
No reproduction without permission.
® and © 1997 Simon & Schuster Inc. All rights reserved.

The right of Philippa Gregory to be identified as author of this work has been asserted by her in accordance with sections 77 and 78 of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act,
1988.

Simon & Schuster UK Ltd
1st Floor
222 Gray’s Inn Road
London WC1X 8HB

www.simonandschuster.co.uk

Simon & Schuster Australia, Sydney
Simon & Schuster, India, New Delhi

A CIP catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library

Hardback ISBN 978-0-85720-746-3
Trade Paperback ISBN 978-0-85720-747-0
eBook ISBN 978-0-85720-750-0

Typeset by M Rules
Printed and bound by CPI Group (UK) Ltd, Croydon, CR0 4YY

For Anthony

CONTENTS

THE TOWER OF LONDON, MAY 1465

L’ERBER, LONDON, JULY 1465

BARNARD CASTLE, COUNTY DURHAM, AUTUMN 1465

WARWICK CASTLE, SPRING 1468

CALAIS CASTLE, 11 JULY 1469

CALAIS CASTLE, 12 JULY 1469

CALAIS CASTLE, SUMMER 1469

ENGLAND, AUTUMN 1469

WESTMINSTER PALACE, LONDON, CHRISTMAS 1469–70

WESTMINSTER PALACE, LONDON, JANUARY 1470

WARWICK CASTLE, MARCH 1470

DARTMOUTH, DEVON, APRIL 1470

THE RIVER SEINE, FRANCE, MAY 1470

ANGERS, FRANCE, JULY 1470

ANGERS CATHEDRAL, 25 JULY 1470

AMBOISE, FRANCE, WINTER 1470

PARIS, CHRISTMAS 1470

HARFLEUR, FRANCE, MARCH 1471

HARFLEUR, FRANCE, 12 APRIL 1471

CERNE ABBEY, WEYMOUTH, 15 APRIL 1471

TEWKESBURY, GLOUCESTERSHIRE, 4 MAY 1471

WORCESTER, MAY 1471

THE TOWER OF LONDON, 21 MAY 1471

L’ERBER, LONDON, AUTUMN 1471

WESTMINSTER PALACE, LONDON, CHRISTMAS 1471

L’ERBER, LONDON, FEBRUARY 1472

ST MARTIN’S, LONDON, FEBRUARY 1472

ST MARTIN’S, LONDON, APRIL 1472

ST MARTIN’S, LONDON, MAY 1472

LAMBETH PALACE, LONDON, SUMMER 1472

WINDSOR CASTLE, SEPTEMBER 1472

FOTHERINGHAY CASTLE, NORTHAMPTONSHIRE, AUTUMN 1472

WINDSOR CASTLE, CHRISTMAS 1472

MIDDLEHAM CASTLE, YORKSHIRE, SPRING 1473

MIDDLEHAM CASTLE, YORKSHIRE, JUNE 1473

FARLEIGH HUNGERFORD CASTLE, SOMERSET, 14 AUGUST 1473

BAYNARD’S CASTLE, LONDON, SUMMER 1473

MIDDLEHAM CASTLE, YORKSHIRE, JULY 1474

MIDDLEHAM CASTLE, YORKSHIRE, SPRING 1475

LONDON, SUMMER 1475

BAYNARD’S CASTLE, LONDON, SEPTEMBER 1475

MIDDLEHAM CASTLE, YORKSHIRE, SUMMER 1476

WESTMINSTER PALACE, LONDON, AUTUMN 1476

WESTMINSTER PALACE, LONDON, CHRISTMAS DAY 1476

WESTMINSTER PALACE, LONDON, JANUARY 1477

BAYNARD’S CASTLE, LONDON, JANUARY 1477

LONDON, APRIL 1477

BAYNARD’S CASTLE, LONDON, MAY 1477

MIDDLEHAM CASTLE, YORKSHIRE, SUMMER 1477

MIDDLEHAM CASTLE, YORKSHIRE, AUTUMN 1477

WESTMINSTER PALACE, LONDON, CHRISTMAS 1477

WESTMINSTER PALACE, LONDON, JANUARY 1478

BAYNARD’S CASTLE, LONDON, FEBRUARY 1478

BAYNARD’S CASTLE, LONDON, MARCH 1478

MIDDLEHAM CASTLE, YORKSHIRE, SUMMER 1482

WESTMINSTER PALACE, LONDON, WINTER 1482–3

MIDDLEHAM CASTLE, YORKSHIRE, APRIL 1483

MIDDLEHAM CASTLE, YORKSHIRE, MAY 1483

MIDDLEHAM CASTLE, YORKSHIRE, JUNE 1483

BAYNARD’S CASTLE, LONDON, JUNE 1483

THE TOWER OF LONDON, JULY 1483

A ROYAL PROGRESS, SUMMER 1483

MIDDLEHAM CASTLE, YORKSHIRE, OCTOBER 1483

MIDDLEHAM CASTLE, YORKSHIRE, WINTER 1483

WESTMINSTER PALACE, LONDON, NOVEMBER 1483

GREENWICH PALACE, LONDON, MARCH 1484

NOTTINGHAM CASTLE, MARCH 1484

NOTTINGHAM CASTLE, SUMMER 1484

WESTMINSTER PALACE, LONDON, WINTER 1484

WESTMINSTER PALACE, LONDON, JANUARY 1485

WESTMINSTER PALACE, LONDON, MARCH 1485

THE TOWER OF LONDON, MAY 1465

My Lady Mother goes first, a great heiress in her own right, and the wife of the greatest subject in the kingdom. Isabel follows, because she is the oldest. Then me: I come
last, I always come last. I can’t see much as we walk into the great throne room of the Tower of London, and my mother leads my sister to curtsey to the throne and steps aside. Isabel sinks
down low, as we have been taught, for a king is a king even if he is a young man put on the throne by my father. His wife will be crowned queen, whatever we may think of her. Then as I step
forwards to make my curtsey I get my first good view of the woman that we have come to court to honour.

She is breathtaking: the most beautiful woman I have ever seen in my life. At once I understand why the king stopped his army at the first sight of her, and married her within weeks. She has a
smile that grows slowly and then shines, like an angel’s smile. I have seen statues that would look stodgy beside her, I have seen painted Madonnas whose features would be coarse beside her
pale luminous loveliness. I rise up from my curtsey to stare at her as if she were an exquisite icon; I cannot look away. Under my scrutiny her face warms, she blushes, she smiles at me, and I
cannot help but beam in reply. She laughs at that, as if she finds my open adoration amusing, and then I see my mother’s furious glance and I scuttle to her side where my sister Isabel is
scowling. ‘You were staring like an idiot,’ she hisses. ‘Embarrassing us all. What would Father say?’

The king steps forwards and kisses my mother warmly on both cheeks. ‘Have you heard from my dear friend, your lord?’ he asks her.

‘Working well in your service,’ she says promptly, for Father is missing tonight’s banquet and all the celebrations, as he is meeting with the King of France himself and the
Duke of Burgundy, meeting with them as an equal, to make peace with these mighty men of Christendom now that the sleeping king has been defeated and we are the new rulers of England. My father is a
great man; he is representing this new king and all of England.

The king, the new king – our king – does a funny mock-bow to Isabel and pats my cheek. He has known us since we were little girls too small to come to such banquets and he was a boy
in our father’s keeping. Meanwhile my mother looks about her as if we were at home in Calais Castle, seeking to find fault with something the servants have done. I know that she is longing to
see anything that she can report later to my father as evidence that this most beautiful queen is unfit for her position. By the sour expression on her face I guess that she has found nothing.

Nobody likes this queen; I should not admire her. It shouldn’t matter to us that she smiles warmly at Isabel and me, that she rises from her great chair to come forwards and clasp my
mother’s hands. We are all determined not to like her. My father had a good marriage planned for this king, a great match with a princess of France. My father worked at this, prepared the
ground, drafted the marriage contract, persuaded people who hate the French that this would be a good thing for the country, would safeguard Calais, might even get Bordeaux back into our keeping,
but then Edward, the new king, the heart-stoppingly handsome and glamorous new king, our darling Edward – like a younger brother to my father and a glorious uncle to us – said as simply
as if he was ordering his dinner that he was married already and nothing could be done about it. Married already? Yes, and to Her.

He did very wrong to act without my father’s advice; everyone knows that. It is the first time he has done so in the long triumphant campaign that took the House of York from shame, when
they had to beg the forgiveness of the sleeping king and the bad queen, to victory and the throne of England. My father has been at Edward’s side, advising and guiding him, dictating his
every move. My father has always judged what is best for him. The king, even though he is king now, is a young man who owes my father everything. He would not have his throne if it were not for my
father taking up his cause, teaching him how to lead an army, fighting his battles for him. My father risked his own life, first for Edward’s father, and then for Edward himself, and then,
just when the sleeping king and the bad queen had run away, and Edward was crowned king, and everything should have been wonderful forever, he went off and secretly married Her.

BOOK: The Kingmaker's Daughter
5.74Mb size Format: txt, pdf, ePub
ads

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