The Splendid and the Vile: A Saga of Churchill, Family, and Defiance During the Blitz (57 page)

BOOK: The Splendid and the Vile: A Saga of Churchill, Family, and Defiance During the Blitz
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C
HAPTER 14: “
T
HIS
Q
UEER AND
D
EADLY
G
AME”

Churchill spoke of parachute troops
:
Gilbert,
War Papers,
2:360–68.

“Some suggested he was drunk”
:
Toye,
Roar of the Lion,
59.

“Whether he was drunk”
:
Ibid.

“Experience of the campaign”
:
“Urgent Measures to Meet Attack,” Report by the Chiefs of Staff, June 19, 1940, CAB 66/8, UKARCH.

When he got to his office
:
Jones,
Most Secret War,
144.

“holding out his hand”
:
Nel,
Mr. Churchill’s Secretary,
30.

“Any chortling by officials”
:
Fort,
Prof,
227; Ismay,
Memoirs,
172; Gilbert,
War Papers,
2:402.

“Make one million”
:
Fort,
Prof,
227.

“bellowing at him”
:
Ibid., 242.

“Love me, love my dog”
:
Ibid.

Jones sensed the tension
:
Jones,
Most Secret War,
145.

“Would it help”
:
Ibid.

“one of the blackest moments”
:
Jones,
Most Secret War,
153.

“there was a general air”
:
Winston Churchill,
Their Finest Hour,
385.

“the load was once again lifted”
:
Jones,
Most Secret War,
153.

“All I get from the Air Ministry”
:
Ibid., 146.

“the principles of”
:
Winston Churchill,
Their Finest Hour,
386–87.

“Had I, after all”
:
Jones,
Most Secret War,
148.

But that Friday
:
Lough,
No More Champagne,
288–89. David Lough’s
No More Champagne
is an excellent account of how Churchill struggled financially through much of his career.

First, Bufton reported
:
Jones,
Most Secret War,
148–49.

C
HAPTER 15:
L
ONDON AND
B
ERLIN

“A wrathful & gloomy”
:
Diary, June 23, 1940, Mary Churchill Papers.

With France quelled
:
Boelcke,
Secret Conferences of Dr. Goebbels,
60.

“Well, this week”
:
Ibid.

C
HAPTER 16:
T
HE
R
ED
W
ARNING

“the awful problem”
:
Cadogan,
Diaries,
306.

“The German Government”
:
“Battle Summary No. 1: Operations Against the French Fleet at Mers-el-Kebir (Oran), July 3–6, 1940,” Appendix A, ADM 234/317, UKARCH.

The clause as later published
:
Ibid.

“Ask half a dozen”
:
Gilbert,
War Papers,
2:415.

“The night is very still”
:
Cockett,
Love and War in London,
109.

“Many people did not”
:
Addison and Crang,
Listening to Britain,
154.

“an intention to land”
:
Gilbert,
War Papers,
2:433n3.

“this should be done”
:
Ibid., 452–53; Lindemann to Churchill, minute, June 30, 1940, F108/21, Lindemann Papers.

“Supposing lodgments were effected”
:
Gilbert,
War Papers,
2:444–45.

“Much thought,” he wrote
:
Note, “Home Defense,” June 28, 1940, War Cabinet Papers, CAB 66/9, UKARCH.

She reported that a member
:
Clementine to Winston, June 27, 1940, CSCT 1/24, Clementine Churchill Papers.

C
HAPTER 17: “
T
OFREK
!

After one weekend
:
Gilbert,
War Papers,
3:555.

“But, no!” he wrote
:
Elletson,
Chequers and the Prime Ministers,
108–9.

“I thought Randolph”
:
Colville,
Fringes of Power,
1:207.

“His coughing is like”
:
Smith,
Reflected Glory,
57.

“was anything but kind”
:
Colville,
Fringes of Power,
1:207.

“Pam was terribly”
:
Ogden,
Life of the Party,
69.

“She’s a wonderful girl”
:
Kathleen Harriman to Mary Harriman Fisk, May 30, 1941, Correspondence, W. Averell Harriman Papers.

“She passed everything”
:
Ogden,
Life of the Party,
123.

“I expect that he”
:
Ibid., 86.

“All you need”
:
Ibid., 85.

“One of the secrets”
:
Sarah Churchill,
Keep on Dancing,
18.

“One to reproduce”
:
Wheeler-Bennett,
Action This Day,
264.

“Combative,” according to one
:
Purnell,
Clementine,
139.

He once pushed
:
Readers will find all three incidents in ibid., 88, 115.

When he was nine
:
Ibid., 182.

“Your idle & lazy life”
:
Winston Churchill to Randolph Churchill, Dec. 29, 1929, RDCH 1/3/3, Randolph Churchill Papers.

Churchill loved him
:
Colville,
Winston Churchill and His Inner Circle,
36.

“as his personality developed”
:
Soames,
Clementine Churchill,
315.

“It was indeed generous”
:
Gilbert,
War Papers,
2:231.

“You must get”
:
Ogden,
Life of the Party,
69.

“Are you listening?”
:
Winston S. Churchill,
Memories and Adventures,
6.

The three found themselves
:
Colville,
Fringes of Power,
1:208–9.

“It is a curious feeling”
:
Ibid., 209–10.

C
HAPTER 18:
R
ESIGNATION
N
O. 1

The letter began
:
Beaverbrook to Churchill, June 30, 1940, BBK/D, Beaverbrook Papers.

John Colville guessed
:
Colville,
Fringes of Power,
1:214.

“Dear Minister”
:
Gilbert,
War Papers,
2:454.

“I will certainly not neglect”
:
Young,
Churchill and Beaverbrook,
150.

C
HAPTER 19:
F
ORCE
H

The Royal Navy was poised
:
All references to the Mers el-Kébir episode are drawn from “Battle Summary No. 1: Operations Against the French Fleet at Mers-el-Kebir (Oran), July 3–6, 1940,” ADM 234/317, UKARCH. It’s a literate and dispassionate recounting, full of excerpts from original documents, and thus wholly chilling. For some reason—possibly convenience—most secondary sources use the name Oran when referring to the incident, but in fact the main action was at Mers el-Kébir.

He called the matter
:
Manchester and Reid,
Defender of the Realm,
107; Martin,
Downing Street,
14. Martin omits the words “and painful.”

“The Germans will force”
:
Young,
Churchill and Beaverbrook,
153.

The war in the west
:
Koch, “Hitler’s ‘Programme’ and the Genesis of Operation ‘Barbarossa,’ ” 896.

“Britain’s position is hopeless”
:
Halder,
War Diary,
230.

“the plan to invade England”
:
Trevor-Roper,
Blitzkrieg to Defeat,
33.

“There was nothing for it”
:
Ismay,
Memoirs,
149.

“The action was sudden”
:
Winston Churchill,
Their Finest Hour,
233–34.

Churchill paced his office
:
Colville,
Fringes of Power,
1:215.

“It is so terrible”
:
Diary, July 3, 1940, Mary Churchill Papers.

“I leave the judgment”
:
Gilbert,
War Papers,
2:474.

“Fortified”
:
Nicolson,
War Years,
100.

“This is heartbreaking”
:
Colville,
Fringes of Power,
1:216.

The Home Intelligence survey
:
Addison and Crang,
Listening to Britain,
189.

“an act of sheer treachery”
:
Manchester and Reid,
Defender of the Realm,
110.

“I am sure it cut him”
:
Ismay,
Memoirs,
150.

“To this,” Pamela recalled
:
“My Memory of the Lunch in the Downstairs Flat…,” n.d., Churchill Family and Mary Soames File, Pamela Harriman Papers.

Clementine glared at Churchill
:
Inspector Thompson dreaded this look and was all too familiar with it. He knew his own constant presence could be annoying, “far more trying and importunate than protective, at least to her,” and he respected how she kept this displeasure to herself. “She did, however, have an icy way she could look at a man when things went to the snapping point of endurance, and on these occasions I always wished I could disappear till she could recover.” Thompson,
Assignment,
15.

C
HAPTER 20:
B
ERLIN

In July, Hitler met
:
Stafford,
Flight from Reality,
14, 156–57.

“What more can I do?”
:
Ibid., 14.

“Britain has really revealed”
:
Boelcke,
Secret Conferences of Dr. Goebbels,
63.

Anticipating his remarks
:
Ibid., 65.

On July 3, a report
:
“Evacuation of Civil Population from East, South-East, and South Coast Towns,” July 3, 1940, War Cabinet Memoranda, CAB 66/8, UKARCH.

“Information from a most reliable”
:
“Imminence of a German Invasion of Great Britain,” Report by the Joint Intelligence Sub-committee, July 4, 1940, Appendix A, War Cabinet Memoranda, CAB 66/9, UKARCH.

“I have the impression”
:
Colville,
Fringes of Power,
1:218.

“a bad look-out”
:
Ibid., 216.

C
HAPTER 21:
C
HAMPAGNE AND
G
ARBO

“In the intervals”
:
Manuscript Diary, July 10, 1940, Colville Papers. This is one of what Colville called his “trivial” entries, which he omitted in the published version of his diary.

C
HAPTER 22:
H
AVE
W
E
S
UNK
S
O
L
OW
?

“exactly the color of blood”
:
Panter-Downes,
London War Notes,
62.

“Yes,” she said, “I shall not go down”
:
Nicolson,
War Years,
100.

A government pamphlet
:
Panter-Downes,
London War Notes,
71.

By now the Foreign Office
:
Numerous such telegrams can be found in Roosevelt’s papers, in the President’s Secretary’s Files, FDR/Diplo. For example, July 13 and 14, 1940.

“very jolly and noisy”
:
Soames,
Daughter’s Tale,
169.

On one occasion
:
Diary, Aug. 5, 1940, Mary Churchill Papers.

“Have we really sunk”
:
Cockett,
Love and War in London,
124.

“It
shouldn’t be allowed

:
Ibid., 119.

“callous Oxford accent”
:
Addison and Crang,
Listening to Britain,
229.

“a considerable majority”
:
Ibid., 231.

“The majority of decent citizens”
:
Panter-Downes,
London War Notes,
79.

“the bringing down”
:
Addison and Crang,
Listening to Britain,
231.

“After all,” he told an interviewer
:
Gilbert,
War Papers,
2:533.

“The naming of a whole squadron”
:
Farrer,
Sky’s the Limit,
78.

By May 1941
:
Ibid., 79.

“The people appeared”
:
Beaverbrook to Churchill, minute, Jan. 31, 1941, BBK/D, Beaverbrook Papers.

“It will do the players”
:
Farrer,
Sky’s the Limit,
81.

“ ‘On Preparations for a Landing’ ”
:
Trevor-Roper,
Blitzkrieg to Defeat,
34.

BOOK: The Splendid and the Vile: A Saga of Churchill, Family, and Defiance During the Blitz
10.18Mb size Format: txt, pdf, ePub
ads

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