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Authors: Alison Hughes

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Beatrice More Moves In

BOOK: Beatrice More Moves In
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Beatrice
More
Moves In
Alison Hughes
illustrated by
Helen Flook

O
R
C
A
B
O
O
K
P
U
B
L
I
S
H
E
R
S

Text copyright © 2015 Alison Hughes

Illustrations copyright © 2015 Helen Flook

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted
in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording
or by any information storage and retrieval system now known or to be invented, without
permission in writing from the publisher.

Library and Archives Canada Cataloguing in Publication

Hughes, Alison, 1966 –, author

Beatrice More moves in / Alison Hughes ; illustrated by Helen Flook.

(Orca echoes)

Issued in print and electronic formats.

ISBN
978-1-4598-0761-7 (pbk.).—
ISBN
978-1-4598-0762-4 (pdf).—
ISBN
978-1-4598-0763-1
(epub)

I. Flook, Helen, illustrator II. Title. III. Series: Orca echoes

PS
8615.
U
3165
B
43 2015       j
C
813'.6       
C
2015-901726-2

C
2015-901727-0

First published in the United States, 2015

Library of Congress Control Number
: 2015935531

Summary
: Beatrice struggles to manage her hopelessly disorganized family in an effort
to make a professional start in her new neighborhood in this early chapter book.

Orca Book Publishers gratefully acknowledges the support for its publishing programs
provided by the following agencies: the Government of Canada through the Canada Book
Fund and the Canada Council for the Arts, and the Province of British Columbia through
the BC Arts Council and the Book Publishing Tax Credit.

Cover artwork and interior illustrations by Helen Flook
Author photo by Barbara Heintzman

ORCA BOOK PUBLISHERS

www.orcabook.com

18
17
16
15

4
3
2
1

For my sisters,
Maureen and Jen

Contents

Chapter One

Chapter Two

Chapter Three

Chapter Four

Chapter Five

Chapter Six

Chapter Seven

Chapter Eight

Chapter One

It wasn’t that Beatrice More didn’t like boxes. She did.

She especially liked boxes that were perfect squares. They stacked easily. They held
things that would otherwise mess up the house. They were neat and tidy.

But today Beatrice was sick of boxes. Very,
very
sick of boxes. Looking around her
new house, all she could see were stacks of them. On the floor. On the kitchen counters.
On the furniture.

Boxes everywhere.

Beatrice had tried to tell the movers where to put the boxes. But they just carried
them in and dumped them anywhere.

She tried to scrub off the smudgy, sticky handprints the movers left on the walls.
But they kept making them faster than she could scrub them off.

She said, “Somebody’s walking through the house
with their shoes on!
” very loudly
several times before her mother finally shushed her.

The moving guys were horrible listeners. They just smiled, carried in more boxes
with their sticky hands and kept making a bigger and bigger mess.

But the movers were gone now. The big, noisy moving truck was just pulling away from
the driveway.

“It’s about time,” grumbled Beatrice. She stood in the living room with her hands
on her hips. As she looked around, her eyes narrowed.

“What a
dump,
” she said to herself, shaking her head slowly.

Her mother came into the room. She looked around happily.

“Well, this is exciting!” she said. “A new house, a new neighborhood, a new city!
Are you excited, Bee?”


Beatrice.
” How many times had she told her family not to call her Bee? Nine thousand?
Nineteen thousand? Ninety thousand? Bee was not a name at all. It was a letter. Or
worse, an insect. An insect that buzzed annoyingly. An insect people ran away from,
screaming.

Bee certainly wasn’t the name of a future Olympic gymnastics gold-medal winner.

Or a future prize-winning scientist. Or a famous artist or writer. And those were
all on Beatrice’s list of
Very Successful Careers to Consider
.

“Have you
looked
at this place, Mom?” Beatrice said. “It’s a mess! There are way,
way
too many boxes!”

“Well, Bee,” said her mother, pushing her frizzy hair out of her eyes, “we only moved
in this morning! We’re just getting started.”

Beatrice crossed her arms.

“I’ve already unpacked
my
room. Perfectly.”

It was the first room she had all to herself. The first room she didn’t have to share
with her messy little sister, Sophie. Beatrice loved her new room. It was perfect.

“Wow. Really?” Her mother looked impressed. “Want to show me?”

On the door to Beatrice’s room there was a small, square sign with neat purple letters.

“Ah, here’s your room,” said her mother, smiling at the sign. She looked down at
her grubby hands and rubbed them on her jeans.

“Now, if I let you in, you can’t touch anything,” warned Beatrice. “Nothing.
You
can’t wrinkle the bed or rumple the carpet or touch anything
at all.

“Got it. I won’t even breathe.”

Beatrice opened the door.

The purple quilt on the bed was perfectly smooth. Not one wrinkle or ripple. The
pillow was perfectly plumped. A square purple-and-white rug sat exactly in the center
of the room.

The small white desk was perfectly clean. All of Beatrice’s lists were stacked neatly
in the top drawer. Each book in the bookcase had a special place—tallest to shortest.
The stuffed animals on the bed were lined up alphabetically, from Annabelle (a duck)
to Zeke (a horse).

“Well, you’re right, Bee,” sighed her mother. “It’s perfect. But don’t you want it
to look a little lived-in? Maybe a little
less
perfect?”

Beatrice wasn’t listening.

“Check out my closet,” Beatrice said. She swung open the door. “Ta-daaaah!”

Beatrice’s closet was, if possible, even neater than the rest of the room.

“Note the matching purple hangers,” she said, “and the way I’ve hung all the clothes
by color—blue, red, white, yellow and, of course, my favorite color, purple.”

Her mother leaned against the doorjamb.

“How on earth do you live in the rest of our house?” she asked softly, shaking her
head.

Beatrice didn’t hear her. She was carefully shutting her closet door.

“Well, kiddo, your room looks great. Perfect, in fact,” her mom said. “I guess I
better start on the rest of this house.
Why don’t you see how Sophie’s doing with
her new room?”

“Good idea,” Beatrice said.

Her little sister should have unpacked at least
some
of her boxes by now. But Beatrice
didn’t expect much. Sophie was only four years old, after all. Four years younger
than Beatrice.

Beatrice looked over at Sophie’s room. There was a torn scrap of paper taped crookedly
to the door.

Sophie had taped the paper to the door first, then written on it. The long tail of
the
y
went down off the paper onto the white door.

Beatrice licked her finger and scrubbed at the smudge on the door. And scrubbed.
And scrubbed. It didn’t come off.

“Permanent marker,” Beatrice said through gritted teeth. She made a mental
note to
include Sophie’s door on her list of
Things That Are Annoyingly Hard to Clean
.

BOOK: Beatrice More Moves In
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